Reasons to Take Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Omega-3 fatty acids are considered essential fatty acids. They are necessary for human health, but the body can’t make them. You have to get them through food. Omega-3 fatty acids are found in fish, such as salmon, tuna, and halibut, other sea foods including algae and krill, some plants, and nut oils. Also known as polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), omega-3 fatty acids play a crucial role in brain function, as well as normal growth and development. They have also become popular because they may reduce the risk of heart disease. The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends eating fish (particularly fatty fish such as mackerel, lake trout, herring, sardines, albacore tuna, and salmon) at least 2 times a week.
 Proven cardiovascular health benefits
– Blood triglyceride (TG) levels are an important indicator of cardiovascular health and disease risk. In general
the lower the number, the lower the disease risk. Omega-3 causes a significant TG reduction.
– Raises total omega-3 index to levels associated with the “zone of greatest protection” from cardiovascular disease.
Proven anti-inflammatory benefits
It is well established in scientific literature that inflammation is one of the driving forces behind aging and disease. The effects of low-level inflammation of cells and tissues amplified by long periods of time have been directly implicated in the epidemic of chronic disease that is seen across the world today. Trial show that supplementation with Omega-III  works rapidly and
dramatically to re-balance these forces by Increasing anti-inflammatory omega-3’s and displacing inflammatory Arachidonic Acid.

High Cholesterol

People who follow a Mediterranean-style diet tend to have higher HDL (good) cholesterol levels, which help promote heart health. Inuit Eskimos, who get high amounts of omega-3 fatty acids from eating fatty fish, also tend to have increased HDL cholesterol and decreased triglycerides (fats in the blood). Several studies show that fish oil supplements reduce triglyceride levels. Walnuts, which are rich in alpha linolenic acid or ALA, which can convert to omega-3s in the body, have been reported to lower total cholesterol and triglycerides in people with high cholesterol levels.

High Blood Pressure

Several clinical studies suggest that diets rich in omega-3 fatty acids lower blood pressure in people with hypertension. An analysis of 17 clinical studies using fish oil supplements found that taking 3 or more grams of fish oil daily may reduce blood pressure in people with untreated hypertension. Doses this high, however, should only be taken under the direction of a physician.

Diabetes

People with diabetes often have high triglyceride and low HDL levels. Omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil can help lower triglycerides and apoproteins (markers of diabetes), and raise HDL. So eating foods or taking fish oil supplements may help people with diabetes. Another type of omega-3 fatty acid, ALA (from flaxseed, for example) may not have the same benefit as fish oil. Some people with diabetes can’t efficiently convert ALA to a form of omega-3 fatty acids that the body can use. Also, some people with type 2 diabetes may have slight increases in fasting blood sugar when taking fish oil. So talk to your doctor to see if fish oil is right for you.

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Laboratory studies suggest that diets rich in omega-3 fatty acids (and low in the inflammatory omega-6 fatty acids) may help people with osteoarthritis. More study is needed. New Zealand green lipped mussel (Perna canaliculus), another potential source of omega-3 fatty acids, has been reported to reduce joint stiffness and pain, increase grip strength, and improve walking pace in a small group of people with osteoarthritis. For some people, symptoms worsened before they improved.

Every now and then we read of new studies being done on essential fatty acids. These are not the only benefits of omega 3 fatty acids, and there may be more.

Dietary Sources

Fish, plants, and nut oils are the primary dietary sources of omega-3 fatty acids. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are found in cold-water fish such as salmon, mackerel, halibut, sardines, tuna, and herring. ALA is found in flax seeds, flaxseed oil, canola (rapeseed) oil, soybeans, soybean oil, pumpkin seeds, pumpkin seed oil, purslane, perilla seed oil, walnuts, and walnut oil. The health effects of omega-3 fatty acids come mostly from EPA and DHA. ALA from flax and other vegetarian sources needs to be converted in the body to EPA and DHA. However, many people’s bodies do not make these conversions very effectively. This remains an ongoing debate in the nutrition community; fish and sea vegetable sources of EPA and DHA versus vegetarian sources of ALA. Other sources of omega-3 fatty acids include sea life such as krill and algae.

Getting a reliable source of supplements is of paramount importance to ensure that you get high quality products. Read here to get more information on how to choose your supplements.

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